New Socialist Webzine

The Allure of Violence and the Decline of the Organized Left in India: An Interview with Himani Bannerji (Part 3)

                                               Image source: hindustan times  

This is Part 3 of an interview with Himani Bannerji by New Socialist Editor Salmaan Khan on the outcome of the Indian elections. This final portion of the interview focused on the Communist Party of India (Marxist) (CPI[M]) which fared poorly in these past elections, securing only nine seats out of 97 candidates - a progressive decline from the last two national elections and the lowest since the formation of the party in 1964 - followed by a discussion of the difficulties that come with organizing people according to a formula derived from outdated and inappropriate conceptions of industrialization and capitalist developmentPart 1 of this interview, "India and the Rise of Religious Nationalism," is here. Click here for Part 2, "Masculinity, Islamophobia and Neoliberal Politics in India." 

Read more: The Allure of Violence and the Decline of the Organized Left in India: An Interview with Himani...

Masculinity, Islamophobia and Neoliberal Politics in India: An Interview with Himani Bannerji (Part 2)

 

                                           Image source: hindustan times

What follows is Part 2 of Salmaan Khan's interview with Himani Bannerji. After laying the context for what India looked like going into the 2014 federal elections in Part 1, Bannerji now speaks more directly to the nature of the right-wing Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), the advance of neoliberalism, and the continued oppression faced by marginalized groups in India. Also discussed are the geopolitical implications of a BJP dominated India and the consequences of its relationship with the West. Part 1, "India and the Rise of Religious Nationalism," can be found here 

Read more: Masculinity, Islamophobia and Neoliberal Politics in India: An Interview with Himani Bannerji...

India and the Rise of Religious Nationalism: An Interview with Himani Bannerji (Part 1)

 India recently concluded its 2014 federal elections in which a record 550 million people cast their votes, electing Narendra Modi of the right-wing Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) as Prime Minister and securing his party's position with a majority 282 out of 543 seats in Parliament. New Socialist editor Salmaan Khan had the opportunity to discuss the election results with Bengali-Canadian writer, scholar and activist Himani Bannerji. What follows is Part 1 of a three part interview series. In this first piece Dr. Bannerji lays the context for what India looked like going into these elections and outlines the conditions that helped pave the way for the appeal of religious nationalism. 

                   Image source: Press Information Bureau India 

Read more: India and the Rise of Religious Nationalism: An Interview with Himani Bannerji (Part 1)

Radical Left Praxis in an Election Year: Lessons for Brazil

By Sabrina Fernandes

                        Rally held in June 2013, Brazil. Source: MidiaNinja media collective

The general commentary regarding Brazilian politics is that the "politicians are all the same" or "there is no political alternative" and that even the good ones get corrupted once they reach power. It is no wonder then, that the massive protests of June 2013 throughout Brazil, which were filled with diffuse voices and eclipsed by broad demands, revealed what many termed a crisis of representation.

Read more: Radical Left Praxis in an Election Year: Lessons for Brazil

Colonialism and the Working Class in Canada

By David Camfield

It's good news that in a number of cities people "are meeting together in growing numbers to explore what it means - and doesn't mean - to stand in solidarity with Indigenous peoples within Canada," as journalist Meg Mittelstedt wrote recently.

As Mittelstedt notes, this is happening because of the recent upsurge of protest and resistance by indigenous people. This includes Idle No More, campaigns around murdered and missing women, confrontations with companies that hope to make big profits from fracking, pipeline construction, mining and other activities on the traditional territories of indigenous peoples, and conflicts with governments that want to dismantle anything they see as barriers to corporate profit, including environmental regulations and indigenous rights

Read more: Colonialism and the Working Class in Canada

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